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20121004
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)
: one of the things, juan, she brings up is absolutely true. when you look at the civil rights movement -- you've written about this as well. where was al gore's father? who were did lyndon johnson count on to get the civil rights and voting rights act passed? it seems like the narrative that is being pushed -- i'll even say the president and his campaign this time, we're going to put y'all back in chains, romney is a racist. an obama truth team member said this is a false narrative about conservatives, that they're racists. i resent it. it's not true. al gore's father voted against the civil rights act. a former clansman was a part of the democratic party in the senate. this is a false narrative. do you agree? >> there's lots that's false. in fact when i heard ann was accused of bull feathers, we'll say here this evening, i thought what, you know, ann has stake. i'm reading ann's book. i wrote "eyes on the prize." i know a lot about the civil rights movement. i wrote a biography about marshall. when you look at reconstruction, antilynching laws early in the part of the 20th century, re
, they do have a lot to feel guilty for. it was liberal democrats that were the ones fighting civil rights for 100 years after the civil war in addition to fighting the civil war. and they just write these revisionist histories and then play act themselves being civil rights champions. um, i mean, the quote from bill clinton. on his first inaugural as governor, he was embracing orville -- [inaudible] who stood in the schoolhouse during little rock. democrat bill clinton invites democrat segregationist jay william full bright to the white house to give him the medal of freedom in which he cites fulbright, you know, he teaches us that the russians are people too. but fulbright didn't ever see that black americans were people, too, since he signed the southern manifesto, voted against the '64 civil rights act. cheryl: you really in the book go after politicians, and you say they have used the black community to their own benefit. >> oh, yes. cheryl: give me some specific examples. >> well, that's the funny thing. while being pompous and engaging in this moral training as if they are the champ
in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year very slowly and were reaffirmed and reshaped in the appropriations and budget legislation. families, people came to trust
. the naacp is pressing the u.n. to send observers to monitor this year's elections. the civil rights group believes that the 6 million americans are being blocked from voting because of felony criminal records. >>> in spain, dozens of protesters have been injured in clashes with police. they're angry over cuts in public employee salaries. spain races to deal with massive debt. >>> in russia, this is incredible video. it shows a truck driver literally walking away from a crash with another big rig completely unharmed. he was hurled from his cab at the moment of impact and amazingly landed right up with barely a scratch. >>> finally, this is the deepest space you have ever seen. the hubble telescope has sent back a picture more than 13 billion light years in the making. it's a college of views, more than 5,000 galaxies captured over ten years. >>> and now here's an early look at how wall street's going to kick off the day. the dow closed at 13,457 after stumbling 101 points yesterday. the s&p dropped 15. the nasdaq tumbled 43. taking a look at overseas traysing this morning. in tokyo, the ni
, georgia. he's urging faith leaders and even civil rights leaders in the african-american community to mobilize their churches to help kids, parents, and teachers find solutions to the problems in education. he says, kids must come first. >> we just have a crisis in our country. in our public education system is not doing well by our children, it's going to take an entire community to say enough is enough. >> johnson wants to level the playing field for all children who operate from a disadvantage, something he's too familiar with. >> and i grow up in a poor neighborhood and the only way to make it out of the community is basketball and got a scholarship to uc berkley. >> and he knows competing and winning, as a nba player with the phoenix suns enjoyed 12 years as one of the top players of the game. during his nba career, jonathan launched st. hope, a nonprofit community development organization to revitalize earn city communities in his hometown of sacramento. >> i didn't have any of my friends with me on college. they were on drugs, you know, in jail or dead. and i remember thinki
." this is a very old statute enacted by the first congress. it has sat dormant for 170 years. in some civil right type folks picked it up. -- been some civil right type folks picked it up and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign. the defendant is foreign. the tour took place in some foreign place. they say you have jurisdiction over this. courts have been going for this. they have been allowing some of these cases to go forward. this case raised the question of the of -- in this particular case, it took place in nigeria. the guy says the nigerian government committed these against me. they mistreated me. these foreign will company's work implicit -- foreign companies were implicit. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. the defendant say this is not apply to corporations. he cannot actually sue a corporation under the statute. that was their claim. they did something very unusual. they actually said we want to consider a broader question. we would like you to brief not just this question of does it apply to corporations, but also doesn't apply extraterritor
sapphire preferred. >>> the supreme court reconvenes monday with critical civil rights cases on the agenda. but it's november 6th, presidential election day, that could be the biggest day for the future of the court. the average age of the supreme court justices is 66. four justices are in their mid to late 70s. the ideologically divided bench could swing either way depending on who sits in the oval office when the next justice retires. joining me is patricia ann millate head of the firm's supreme court practice. good morning. >> good morning. >> i know you've argued 31 cases before the supreme court. has that experience given you any insight into who might be the next justice to retire? >> well, i think it's very likely that the next president's going to have at least one, and maybe even two appointments on the court. obviously just statistically, if you look at age, justice ginsburg, ruth bader ginsburg is the most likely one if you just look at age. the longest serving ones, justices scalia and kennedy on the court. those type of factors obviously weigh in. >> i'm going to have myr d ja
was blocked in unprecedented ways. >> caller: civil rights. let me make another civil rights point. >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: he is obviously the worst civil rights president we have and this is why -- >> stephanie: oh quite obviously. what? >> caller: because he executed a citizen of the united states without an advocate for the defense. without any judicial involvement, without any judge jury -- >> stephanie: who are you talking about? >> ground strike on the guy who -- >> yes he did. >> caller: let me add one other thing. >> sure. >> caller: we think we know about larky came from the administration so we have no independent information. >> that's not true. the guardian and other places confirmed that's exactly what he did. it was a question of whether or not this was reason enough to do it. now, would you agree that we have had since we've had a standing army, the right to shoot soldiers who go awol in the process? we've had that. >> i would agree with you. >> i'm just saying legally. a command
an economic problem all but it is deeper structure is that it is a civil rights problem. it is wrong. probably constitutionally, to greet a deficit structure which results in a tax necessity which reached out and grab the labor of future children without representation. that is a form of fiscal slavery to read you have reached out and grab their labor to spend it now. who are the but to the advantage? obviously everyone who are -- who benefits from government services and does not so to speak paid their fair share. it might be said there states the receive more than their fair share of government benefits. so there is a benefit by geography. there is one by sector of the economy. he might be -- you might be -- age and income are frequently referred to. they represent degette. that is why it is so difficult for us to close it -- they represent the gap. that is why it is difficult for us to close is carried if i were also a candidate, i want to talk about the solution to the civil problem be to invest in kids. it is difficult to solve this problem without an economy that is doing better. one of
that's played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enact aed by republican-controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to actually change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos. groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there's no fraud in our elections. but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly include eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws only protect against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing states lawyers for both sides include no cases of fraud. still says john fund an expert on the subject. >> if someone walks in and votes the name of a dead person and don't need to show i.d. how likely is that dead person to
is inherently unequal. and in the 1960s opening new vistas of civil rights for individuals. and now like much of the nation, polarized and often riven with disaffection while it tends towards what is viewed as conservative world view. the court over its history has given euphoric moments of progress and unfortunate stagnation of the status quo that is desperately needed shaking. but just for clear here's to hoping that justices breyer, ginsberg, society mayor kagan can find the fifth vote that they need to move us forward not backwards. that's my view. on current tv. >>i feel like i don't even know you. >>just stay on your side of the screen, okay? >>brought to you by geico. 15 minutes could save 15% or more on car insurance. visit geico.com for a free rate >> eliot: call it a total and complete failure of the justice system. call it a modern day witch-hunt. call it anything but the way the legal system is supposed to work in this country. it's become a well-known story. in 1993 three children were brutally murdered in the woods of west memphis arkansas. three men who were later to become kno
. and that feels right. why not have nice speech? but the civil rights movement and the protests sitting on a lunch hall and refusing to leave on a lunch counter because they're racist, it's important not to be civil all the time. >> bill: if i go down there and i call somebody a pinhead, am i arrested by the campus police? >> you, according to their code, would be kicked out of school. >> bill: is that right? wow! >> probably wouldn't do it for pinhead. >> bill: wow. i bet you they would if it were me. i bet you they would. >> you do much worse. >> bill: the guys in "animal house" they're not going to the university of north carolina. that's not happening. that movie could have never been made if all the colleges had these. >> these codes are since animal house. in response to "animal house." >> bill: tell them time coming down if they don't knock it off. when we come right back, strange twist to a strange case of welfare fraud. the woman who committed it was a big lottery winner and now she's done. legal is next >> bill: i'm bill o'reilly. legal segment, gay marriage, a mysterious death and terro
to get ahead of things, the plaintiffs here are attorneys, civil rights activists and others who are in regular contact with people overseas particularly people who might well be the subject of electronic surveillance by the federal government and they are challenging the law that allows electronic surveillance, this wiretapping because they're concerned that their case will be picked up. they're claiming to have standing to challenge this law because even though the surveillance might be directed overseas to people they're talking to get their dedication will get picked up in the course of that surveillance and so therefore they have the right to challenge it in court. that is the standing issue we we are dealing with. just to get to the merits for a minute, and the aftermath of the exposÉ in the mid-70's about various abuses in the intelligence community and in short in short is set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court surveillance court here in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purpose to give s
presidents do. on civil rights, especially, there was a lot of movement from 1962, when the tapes start to 1963. it was all changing. the white house had swung very much behind the civil rights movement in the fall of 1963. >> he was very involved in the minut minutia, like our other boss, president clinton. >> exactly. incredible moment in august 28th, 1963, the great martin luther king speech "i have a dream" had just happened and they had a political strategy session where president kennedy went through all the members of the house and senate and what he thought their likelihood was to support civil rights. it was clear, he was on their side, driving it forward. >> there's a little clip that exposes a personal side of the president as well. let's play that. >> i wanted to do back to jordan marsh. >> all right, sir. i want that follow's incompetent who had his picture taken in next to mrs. kennedy's bed. he is a silly bastard. i wouldn't have him running a cat house. >> he is furious over a $5,000 bill for a hospital room, right? sn>> a timely expenditure built for a legitimate reason
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegrated the armed wt tr. appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could havebeen, but he did ts poant. w >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a ar great president? or a great president? think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created --n 1952, 3,it cle,think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if he had been really intent on rolling back the new deal and the fair deal, it would ve been a huge fight and would h
enacted by the first congress. but it sat dormant for 170 odd years. then some civil rights type folks picked it up and human rights type folks and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and the tort took place in some foreign place and they are bringing it to u.s. courts. so a paraguayan plaintiff and a pair of wayne defendant and it took place in her way. so the ticket to a u.s. -- a paraguayan plaintiff and a paraguayan defendant and it took place in paraguay. so they take it to the u.s. in this particular case, k iobal takes place in nigeria. and the nigerian government mistreated me, torture and so forth and these will companies, foreign oil companies, were complice it, helping the nigerian government do this to me. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. and the oil companies defendants say that this does not apply to corporations. you cannot sue a corporation under this statute. that was their claim last year at the supreme court and the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual.
decisions of our time in july the justices returned from their break and begin a new term dominated by civil rights issues. joining me from the supreme court, nbc news justice correspondent pete williams. pete, we're talking about major cases that will reshape potentially reshape policy for the united states on affirmative action, voting rights, and on gay marriage. >> very much so. let's begin with affirmative action president the court will hear that case next week. every selective university in america uses it in some manner to achieve a racially diverse campus. this is a case from the university of texas. a young high school student there did not qualify automatically as the top 10% of graduates in texas do for admission, so she was looked at in in the remainder of the other 25% of the class, race is a factor, says that's unconstitutional. nine years ago the supreme court gave the green light to colleges to use affirmative action if there were no race neutral methods to get to diversity. the question is whether the court has changed and become more conservative when they look at it they
. >> he takes legislation that wasn't going to pass civil rights, the tax cut bill and in an in tant johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very, very, very much. >> chris: last week, caro took part in the library of congress book festival on the national mall and made clear he made johnson come alive for many reader. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him. you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying look at what he is doing now. >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rise to power but as we turn to the final book he is writing now, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams that are the destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish this last book? >> well, sure. but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four years but why would you believe me?
with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. john is an independent. hey there. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have neverwhat they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. i voted for ross perot once. i am
with civil rights of the '60s. >> host: john is from illinois now. john is an independent. hi there. >> caller: hi. mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. and the reason why it's like -- the reason why i say that is, our taxes in this country have never been set at actually to be fair. what they were set up for originally was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes, and the working class and the poor were supposed to pay most of -- the majority of theirs in home owners taxes, city and state taxes. and that has been all -- it's got everything out of sorts. my problem with what everybody calls a fair tax is, when you're on a fixed income, and these states are going to have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government is going to have such a lower one, that when anybody that is on a fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator, they cost $400, the lowest one they can buy, they have about $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. and the only ones it's going to hurt is people that are retired, people
these cases can be so big they can be exported. civil-rights concerned about cutting back on class-action. too expensive to litigate each case one by one. the justices in the comcast case will consider the question of how much judges should decide about the case before certifying and saying everyone can be in all the lawsuits together. do they have to figure route if all these people and have one theory of damages or have to look at whether there was a fraud or securities fraud case so there will be more in line of the wal-mart decision about class-action procedure? two tiny actions. people in college try to get text books that are not incredibly expensive. the supreme court has a copyright case about what happens with market goods. text books made overseas when sold at a lower price are imported to the united states. producer of that book or any other copyrighted material have a right to limit it coming into the united states and actually a body on the questions of when a lawsuit is moved. a very lawyer the the the the issue but those who are interested and are practicing lawyers there are fi
. >> it is the most important election in the modern history of this country. we've got civil rights on the line. we've got human rights on the ne. >> reporter: 31 states currently have laws in place th will require voters to show i.d. at the polls in novbe voting rights activeists say ste laws are disproportionately targeting minorities saying these laws have proven to be costly, ineffective and unnecessary. >> proponents say they prevent fraud at the voting booth. but activists know these laws are also likely to lead to reduced voter turnout. in addition a recent study found nearly half of the nation's states have new voting measure that could stop some latinos from heading to the polls in november. some states are using inaccurate or ated citizenship lists. inome cases rerecently natulized cits purged from those lists. >> what we do object to is very narrow requirements that place burdens on poor people, on the elderly, on people of color or ethnic groups that make it harderfo the to vote. >> reporter: for john hazelwood, his decision to register vote is driven by a simple motivation. >> i'm in
to end that civil war right now. >>shepard: thank you, jonathan hunt. thank you very much. joining us is a official intelligence officer for the defense secretary's office, mike barrett, currently c.e.o. of a consulting firm in washington, dc. president morsi of egypt had a little bit for everyone. some condemnation of us. some condemnation for the civil war. also, words for iran. what did you think? >>guest: it is important we in the west understand this issue about freedom of speech. this is an important thing. it will come back. we saw with the cartoons a few years ago, a notion there are things you cannot do. we in the west have freedoms but that is not the reality on the arab street. with morsi, what we are seeing is a reflection of what that part of the world feels like. we have to figure out how to deal with it. it is a reality in foreign policy we will have to deal with post arab spring. >>shepard: i read a couple of articles equating it to fire in a crowded theater, making the argument or should not be able to do something under freedom of speech that is absolutely going to i
. megyn: just ahead, america's most prominent civil right group is asking the united nations to investigate what it calls racist voting laws in the united states. the controversial case in today's "kelly's court." one senator is calling it benghazi gait. the growing questions about the killings of four americans in libya and how the white house characterized it from the days since. we'll have reaction from the former white house chief of stop andy card. >> al qaeda sacks an embassy and kills an ambassador. the administration didn't want to admit it. the administration thinking if it stringt out long enough the media would let it slide. [ male announcer ] sponges take your mark. [ female announcer ] one drop of ultra daw has twice the everyday grease cleaning ingredients eading non-concentrated brand... to clean 2x more greasy dishes. dawn does more. so it's not a chore. megyn: 2:31 in the east. back to our top story. several deputy kralts on the senate foreign relations committee have joined republicans sending a lower the state department asking what kind of intelligence we
concealuse some opposition in fear of sounding politically incorrect. -- is a civil rights activist. he says he will not shy away low point in his life, his 1990 cocaine possession arrest. now, the roads right morning, another accident old town alexandria. some delays at king street. at 395 anda look street, you can see we are welling to recover quite on 395. earlier crash bad to the 14th street bridge. in maryland, still a slow go. from collegeek the outer loop of the the 95 interchange to georgia avenue. .good to see things moving the bog is lifting. well.hould help as warm. 67 at reagan national. at dulles. the board. p.d., partly sunny. a few thunderstorms possible late. pit bull per your saturday, 75. may come back sunday.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)